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(10-02-2010 08:44 PM)robag Wrote: [ -> ]
(10-02-2010 07:50 AM)Bassbait Wrote: [ -> ]If the writer in the movie doesn't exist, but is instead an alter ego of Alex, is there a reason he is a writer? Is this suggesting something about Alex? Just questions.

Yes ... clue, Alex has a typewriter in his bedroom.

So... Alex is Jack Torrance?

Sorry, I have no clue what that implies, because I still haven't seen ACO. I'm just going off a basic knowledge of the movie.
(10-02-2010 11:49 AM)thisisallyouneed Wrote: [ -> ]On the topic of books, there's one book that stands out. When Alex and the priest are in prison, and they walk to a quiet section among the shelves, it's facing the camera on the top right shelf. The majority of the cover can be seen but I can't read the title. It seems as Kubrick wanted the book to be noticed.
The title could be "Catechism Of Revelation".
[Image: vlcsnap00006m.jpg]
In the middle I can read "Catholic Catechism", "My way to God" and "Jesus & Mary"

And at the bottom there is "Dieu et l'adolescent" (God and the adolescent) Sous la direction de P. le P. Pierre Babin O.M.I., G. Duperray, J. Dupont, G. Riser, Sr Marie-Régis... etc (1963)
The american title is Faith and the adolescent. It seems to be a book about psychology

[Image: vlcsnap00007zm.jpg]
L'Eglise en prière : Introduction à la Liturgie, by Aimé Georges Martimort
http://www.amazon.com/Church-Prayer-Intr...0814613632

[Image: vlcsnap00009d.jpg]
CASEL, O., La fête de Pâques dans l’Église des Pères, Paris, Cerf, 1963 (Lex Orandi 37).
The author Odo Casel is german. This is the french translation. It's about Easter, the sacrifice, death and resurrection of the Christ.


[Image: vlcsnap00001su.jpg][Image: 12543l.jpg][Image: 3958.jpg]
WISDEN CRICKETERS' ALMANACK 1970
http://www.sportspages.com/wisdens/wisde...018?search
http://www.cricketbooks.co.uk/products.php?cat=223

At Mr Alexander's house
[Image: vlcsnap00010p.jpg]
Gens de France (People of France?), and another book about god.
I've read somewhere that Mrs Alexander is reading "Clerks and Craftsmen in China and the West: Lectures and Addresses on the History of Science and Technology" by Joseph Needham. But you don't see it in the movie.
@guignol,

are these stills from the blu ray print?
From a blu-ray rip Big Grin

In Alex's cell there's a magazine titled "Uncanny" and a book about drivers :
[Image: vlcsnap00012t.jpg]
Great British Drivers by Sydney Charles Houghton Davis (Hamish Hamilton, 1957)
[Image: notes93931.jpg]
http://www.motorbooks.co.uk/notes.asp?bookid=93931
(10-03-2010 07:16 AM)guignol Wrote: [ -> ]From a blu-ray rip Big Grin

In Alex's cell there's a magazine titled "Uncanny" and a book about drivers :
[Image: vlcsnap00012t.jpg]
Great British Drivers by Sydney Charles Houghton Davis (Hamish Hamilton, 1957)
[Image: notes93931.jpg]
http://www.motorbooks.co.uk/notes.asp?bookid=93931

The UNCANNY comic is an excellent find. It supports several of the themes already in the analysis - have just spent all morning adding updates to chapters 15, 17 and 18 on account of that detail when I should be editing my feature! Thanks again Guignol Smile
Watched Barry Lyndon for the first time last night. Is it me or are the Chevalier and the writer from ACO the same actor? The shot revealing the Chevalier is almost exactly like the one that reveals the writer in ACO. I noticed multiple actors were involved in both Barry Lyndon and ACO.
Yes, it's the same actor. I've talked about some of the similiraties betwen the two films on the Barry Lyndon topic :
http://www.collativelearning.com/mybb_14...58#pid4058


About the books, the sentence "For ever, and ever, and ever.", said by Alex before he jumps, is partially in the bible :
Quote:And the Devil that deceived them
was cast into the lake of fire and
brimstone, where the Beast and
the false prophet are, and shall
be tormented day and night for
ever and ever…

Revelation 20:10
It could be linked with the book "Catechism Of Revelation" (if it's the good title). The book about God and the adolescent seems to mirror the Prison Chaplain and Alex. Alex says he wants to be one act of goodness for the rest of his life, and the chaplain talk about stopping to be a man with the treatment, which could be related with Jesus and his death, so the book about easter. They end their discussion with a pray ("L'Eglise en prière").

[Image: snapshot20101003181944.jpg][Image: 3958.jpg]
I guess the cricketer must stay behind the white line.


Rob Ager Wrote:We also see a small Alex kicking open the orange peel to reveal its inorganic interior.
http://collativelearning.com/ACO%20chapter%2017%20.html
Alex also seems to be kicking in the face of a man in the shadow.
[Image: clockworkorangea.jpg]
Which could be related with the Jungian concept of shadow :
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Shadow_%28psychology%29
As we know Kubrick read some stuff from Jung
Full Metal Jacket Wrote:Private Joker: I think I was trying to suggest something about the duality of man, sir.
Pogue Colonel: The what?
Private Joker: The duality of man. The Jungian thing, sir.

I've read about the shadow in an analysis of Avatar. There are some psychology references in the film, like a character named Parker Selfridge representing the ego (trying to obtain the unobtainium), another called Norm, and so on. In the film Jake Sully go to fight a "dragon"(Toruk) called "The Last Shadow". He jumps on it and there's a fade to black on the screen. Quite the same thing happens in A Clockwork Orange, Alex try to escape his pyramid by jumping and there's a fade to black when he hit the ground. For the journalist, the struggle with the shadow is an inner conflict and can not be represented.
Note that the film also talks about castration with a man in a wheelchair.

[Image: tramp20beating20wide20s.png]
Quote: PLAYBOY: If life is so purposeless, do you feel that it’s worth living?

KUBRICK : Yes, for those of us who manage somehow to cope with our mortality. The very meaninglessness of life forces man to create his own meaning. Children, of course, begin life with an untarnished sense of wonder, a capacity to experience total joy at something as simple as the greenness of a leaf; but as they grow older, the awareness of death and decay begins to impinge on their consciousness and subtly erode their joie de vivre, their Idealism—and their assumption of Immortality. As a child matures, he sees death and pain everywhere about him, and begins to lose faith in the ultimate goodness of man. But if he’s reasonably strong—and lucky—he can emerge from this twilight of the soul into a rebirth of life’s élan. Both because of and in spite of his awareness of the meaninglessness of life, he can forge a fresh sense of purpose and affirmation. He may not recapture the same pure sense of wonder he was born with, but he can shape something far more enduring and sustaining. The most terrifying fact about the universe is not that it is hostile but that it is indifferent; but if we can come to terms with this indifference and accept the challenges of life within the boundaries of death—however mutable man may be able to make them—our existence as a species can have genuine meaning and fulfilment. However vast the darkness, we must supply our own light.

Interviewed by Eric Nordern, Playboy (September 1968); later published in Stanley Kubrick: Interviews (2001)
(10-04-2010 05:04 AM)guignol Wrote: [ -> ]
Rob Ager Wrote:We also see a small Alex kicking open the orange peel to reveal its inorganic interior.
http://collativelearning.com/ACO%20chapter%2017%20.html
Alex also seems to be kicking in the face of a man in the shadow.
[Image: clockworkorangea.jpg]
Which could be related with the Jungian concept of shadow :
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Shadow_%28psychology%29
As we know Kubrick read some stuff from Jung
Full Metal Jacket Wrote:Private Joker: I think I was trying to suggest something about the duality of man, sir.
Pogue Colonel: The what?
Private Joker: The duality of man. The Jungian thing, sir.
Ha. I never noticed the fella getting kicked in the face. He looks like he's wearing a suit and his hand appears almost metalic like the wheelchaired nazi in Dr Strangelove.

(10-04-2010 05:04 AM)guignol Wrote: [ -> ]
Quote: PLAYBOY: If life is so purposeless, do you feel that it’s worth living?

KUBRICK : Yes, for those of us who manage somehow to cope with our mortality. The very meaninglessness of life forces man to create his own meaning. Children, of course, begin life with an untarnished sense of wonder, a capacity to experience total joy at something as simple as the greenness of a leaf; but as they grow older, the awareness of death and decay begins to impinge on their consciousness and subtly erode their joie de vivre, their Idealism—and their assumption of Immortality. As a child matures, he sees death and pain everywhere about him, and begins to lose faith in the ultimate goodness of man. But if he’s reasonably strong—and lucky—he can emerge from this twilight of the soul into a rebirth of life’s élan. Both because of and in spite of his awareness of the meaninglessness of life, he can forge a fresh sense of purpose and affirmation. He may not recapture the same pure sense of wonder he was born with, but he can shape something far more enduring and sustaining. The most terrifying fact about the universe is not that it is hostile but that it is indifferent; but if we can come to terms with this indifference and accept the challenges of life within the boundaries of death—however mutable man may be able to make them—our existence as a species can have genuine meaning and fulfilment. However vast the darkness, we must supply our own light.

Interviewed by Eric Nordern, Playboy (September 1968); later published in Stanley Kubrick: Interviews (2001)

That's a really good quote regarding Kubrick's thoughts on the possibility of an afterlife.
(10-04-2010 06:33 AM)robag Wrote: [ -> ]
(10-04-2010 05:04 AM)guignol Wrote: [ -> ]
Rob Ager Wrote:We also see a small Alex kicking open the orange peel to reveal its inorganic interior.
http://collativelearning.com/ACO%20chapter%2017%20.html
Alex also seems to be kicking in the face of a man in the shadow.
[Image: clockworkorangea.jpg]
Which could be related with the Jungian concept of shadow :
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Shadow_%28psychology%29
As we know Kubrick read some stuff from Jung
Full Metal Jacket Wrote:Private Joker: I think I was trying to suggest something about the duality of man, sir.
Pogue Colonel: The what?
Private Joker: The duality of man. The Jungian thing, sir.
Ha. I never noticed the fella getting kicked in the face. He looks like he's wearing a suit and his hand appears almost metalic like the wheelchaired nazi in Dr Strangelove.

...Oh, you mean... Dr. Strangelove?
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