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Anyone catch Logan yet?
03-16-2017, 02:34 PM
Post: #1
Anyone catch Logan yet?
Logan was awesome. I think the dark tone worked for this film way more than it did for the Nolan Batman movies or Rogue One. I loved a few obviously deliberate things about the movie, such as
1) they chose not to "future up" the world too far. This wasn't 1987's Robocop predicting cyborgs in 1996. Everything looked mostly the same with a few things here or there that were new, just like if you were to compare 2005 to now.
2) SPOILERS - I really appreciated that they didn't go too deep into the backstory of how they ended up where the movie begins (death of mutants, whatever happenes with Professor X, etc), or what happens to the children at the end of the movie. It's refreshing to have a director who trusts his audience to figure things out by picking up on clues throughout the movie.
3) the extreme violence. Was used a lot like Robocop or Starship Troopers, and really stands out vs the almost laughably censored prior takes on Wolverine.

The R rating really worked for this film.
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03-17-2017, 11:17 PM (This post was last modified: 03-21-2017 12:56 AM by On A Mission From Gadd.)
Post: #2
RE: Anyone catch Logan yet?
No, I have not, but while watching a short documentary about Sam Peckinpah and his use of violence in his films, it struck me that there is a similar scenario about to happen with superhero movies. Peckinpah used violence because he felt, despite cowboy and wild west tv shows playing on tv and coverage of war on tv, no one understood what 'violence' was. He wanted people to understand the reality, that getting shot was not like it was on tv. I may be jumping the gun (nice wan centurion, like it, like it..) but is it too soon to suggest the r rated superhero movie trend established by Deadpool has some sort of cultural significance?

[i]Final cut, that's a scary thing to have given to a guy like me[/i]
PT Anderson
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03-21-2017, 03:21 AM
Post: #3
RE: Anyone catch Logan yet?
I probably wont ever see Logan. Which amazes and depresses me.

Loved comics as a kid, but more and more pop culture is dominated
by the motivation to sell sociopolitical ideals and less about a good story.

And even if they somehow are, the actors are constantly busy offscreen
making statements to alienate their audience.

I was the biggest X-men and comic book fan in the world as a kid, but seeing
what has become of them now has made me never want to see another.

Turning your own childhood heroes against you. Dirty bastards. lol
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03-22-2017, 07:29 AM (This post was last modified: 03-22-2017 07:31 AM by Sinan..)
Post: #4
RE: Anyone catch Logan yet?
Dude, comic books have always been about selling sociopolitical ideals.

Captain America, the name says it all lol.

Alan Moore says some pretty good stuff about the comic book industry. I know you don't like him and you won't check it out, so let me briefly sum it up : they're all a bunch of pussies who wrote about these adolescent idealizations of good and evil while them and their colleagues were getting severely raped by the industry moguls, and they kept their mouth shut just so they could keep on writing these teenage wet dreams, even though the injustices they were being objected to were far more serious than anything their so called heroes ever fought against.

So yeah, basically 99% of comic books are nothing more than semen drying on toilet paper. The 1% is of course Alan Moore and Neil Gaiman.

I'm keeping the European comic literature out of the equation. They have a whole different kind of tradition, one in which artistic expression thrives in ways no average American comic reader can even begin to fathom.
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03-23-2017, 01:42 AM (This post was last modified: 03-23-2017 01:44 AM by On A Mission From Gadd.)
Post: #5
RE: Anyone catch Logan yet?
Well, they should of taken a leaf out of Chuck Berry's book, carry a gun and make sure you get paid! I read a story by a drummer called Gilson Lavis, a seasoned English session drummer, who played with him. Berry had his back to him most of the time on stage, the drummer being behind the singer of course, allowing Lavis to see that fat bulge of money sitting in his back pocket...Chuck's fee for the evening...he always got paid before he played. You are right in a way..pussies...if you allow 'the company' to fleece you yet you still produce work for them,that just fecks it up for everyone else.
What comics do you mean Sinan? Stuff like 2000AD? All the Heavy Metal stuff?

[i]Final cut, that's a scary thing to have given to a guy like me[/i]
PT Anderson
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03-23-2017, 03:21 AM
Post: #6
RE: Anyone catch Logan yet?
Well, the Heavy Metal stuff is a good example. Moebius was one of the greatest illustrators of all time, and he worked with some of the best authors. The Incal for instance is a true masterpiece, albeit a very classic one.

But I was rather referring to how the comic book media is perceived in general, and I'm talking specifically about France because that's the country I'm most familiar with. I'll go with a comparison : Art Spiegelman and Robert Crumb are two American comic artists who are famous around the world, but their current status doesn't change the fact that they belong to the "underground" scene. I mean, people actually felt the need to call "serious" "adult" comics "graphic novels", to make the distinction clear enough, and a few exceptions aside, "graphic novels" have always been "underground" stuff. Whereas in Europe (and France in particular) the "graphic novel" is as mainstream, if not more, as what we'd usually call comics. There isn't a genre that dominates the market, there is enormous variety, and most important, accessibility. You can go to almost any book store or public library, hit the "graphic novel" section, and you can choose anything from single panel cubist fart jokes to water colored existentialist incest stories.

Also, to my knowledge, there is much less stigma attached to the format. It's not considered geek stuff (hell, I haven't been to a single French house that didn't have graphic novels in the bathrooms, and haven't met a single person who hasn't read Tintin or Asterix as a child), the artists get much more respect, and although there still is progress to be made it's more egalitarian, you have much more women who established themselves as respected artists.

I'll even say this : compare American comic book adaptation movies with European graphic novel adaptations (once again it seems France has more faith in their graphic novelists in that subject than any other country). The former, well, it's obvious, we've been seeing nothing but shitty action movies for the past 15 years. The latter, meanwhile, almost always produces original, highly enjoyable, memorable, unique movies.

Of course, there is a rise in superhero comics readership in France with the internet spreading geek culture like supercharged herpes, but the tradition still lives on, and still dominates the market, and thank Shiva for that. Can you imagine how boring life would be if you went to a bookstore and the majority of the comic books were about repressed homosexuals playing make belief in their saturated costumes?

Come to think of it, if that was the actual plot of a comic book it would be awesome. Sadly it's only the hidden narrative even the writers aren't aware of.
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03-23-2017, 05:05 AM (This post was last modified: 03-23-2017 05:37 AM by On A Mission From Gadd.)
Post: #7
RE: Anyone catch Logan yet?
Not being from France, I can't really give an insight, but the French have always been very proud of their artistic output. From my experience, that is because,with respect, the French don't relly do great art. For example, I used play a lot in France and the French would lap us up, because we could play rock 'autentically', where as when they did it, it just didn't sound right. The exception was hip hop. French really lends itself to rapping. I remember being blown away by it when I heard it first in the 90's. I can speak about where I am from regarding comics a bit though. 2000AD was commenting on the modern world. Judge Dredd was obviously referencing Thatcher's police state for example and you could catch that in the cartoon section of the Dailies, so it was far from underground. The secret was, I guess, that people didn't really get the social commentary in the cartoon strip.

[i]Final cut, that's a scary thing to have given to a guy like me[/i]
PT Anderson
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03-23-2017, 07:56 AM
Post: #8
RE: Anyone catch Logan yet?
French popular music isn't really something to be proud of, but in the 70's they had their share of extremely original rock bands, Magma being the most famous.

But saying the French don't really do great art is a huge mistake. Just look at literature, painting (impressionism alone is enough to keep faith in humanity), modern classical music, poetry, cinema, not counting philosophy... The French have one of the richest cultural heritages in the world, but for some reasons that would require a much deeper understanding than my own it's often at odds with the Anglo-Saxon cultural heritage.
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03-23-2017, 12:49 PM
Post: #9
RE: Anyone catch Logan yet?
Shit, there's all the movies they make too...feck, I wasn't thinking. There is a joke in Belgium that politely takes the Michelle out of the French, because outsiders would often cite Belgium born artists and writers as being great 'French' exports, George Simenon, author of the Inspector Maigret novels being one.
I must of been channeling that thought with out due consideration for what I actually wrote, I shall sit on the naughty step for a while!

[i]Final cut, that's a scary thing to have given to a guy like me[/i]
PT Anderson
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